Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg

Events, Seminars, Talks

A list of all Physics & Astronomy talks and seminars taking place in Heidelberg can be found at HePhySTO.


Upcoming events


2024-06-25
16:30
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Re-discovering the Milky Way: a journey through data and simulations
Dr. Sergey Khoperskov (Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture hall (gHS)
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Abstract
Understanding galaxy formation and evolution stands as a fundamental objective in modern scientific research. However, a comprehensive observational and theoretical framework that can account for the vast range of properties observed in galaxies throughout the Universe remains elusive. In this context, the Milky Way is special, as it provides the unique opportunity to investigate complex galaxy assembly processes by studying its resolved stellar populations. Nowadays, knowledge about all Galactic components, from the halo to the disc(s) and bulge, is undergoing a profound revolution thanks to the ESA’s astrometric mission Gaia. Gaia has provided detailed measurements of stellar positions, motions, and parallax for over a billion stars, offering a comprehensive map of our galaxy. Complementing this, spectroscopic data from surveys such as APOGEE, GALAH, GES, and others provide us with stellar parameters, chemical abundances, ages and velocities. These are vital for understanding the mutual interconnection between different Galactic components. In this talk, I aim to demonstrate what we have learned about the Milky Way using the synergy between large observational data sets, various modeling techniques and state-of-the-art galaxy formation simulations. This integrated approach has led to an in-depth understanding of the disc mass assembly history, the impact of the bar and spiral arms, the formation and present-day structure of the bulge, and the build-up of the Milky Way's stellar halo. Finally, I will discuss how our detailed knowledge about the Milky Way can be used to fill the gaps in our picture of galactic evolution in general. Those unable to attend the colloquium in person are invited to participate online through Zoom (Meeting ID: 942 0262 2849, passcode 792771) using the link: https://eu02web.zoom-x.de/j/94202622849?pwd=dGlPQXBiUytzY1M2UE5oUDRhbzNOZz09 During his visit to Heidelberg, Dr Khoperskov will be available for meetings by arrangement with his host Dr Guiglion Guillaume (guiglion@mpia.de).

2024-06-27
11:15
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Mapping AGN Ionized Gas Outflows: Insights from Different Selection Techniques
Marco Alban (ARI)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1.OG
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Abstract
AGN belong to the Universe's most powerful non-explosive sources, and their emission covers the whole electro-magnetic spectrum. Different methods are therefore employed to identify AGN, but, most importantly, the various wavelength regimes provide different windows on AGN physics. The physical processes that may impact whether an AGN is detected in a given astronomical observation at a given wavelength and which class it is then assigned to may include orientation, accretion rate, black hole mass, environment, host galaxy properties, and cosmic time (redshift). Understanding the differences and similarities between these different AGN classes is a pre-requisite to understanding AGN physics and the role AGN play in galaxy evolution. We have compiled a sample of 632 AGN among the galaxies observed within the large MaNGA IFU survey. These AGN were identified through independent selection techniques, such as radio, BPT, broad-lines, mid-IR color, and X-ray selections. Using the MaNGA IFU data, we have mapped and characterized ionized gas flows in these sources to understand the dependence of galaxy-wide outflows on host galaxy properties, AGN class, and AGN luminosity. I will present how wind characteristics and outflow sizes differ between AGN samples, which parameters drive these differences, and how strongly AGN feedback signatures suffer from selection bias. I will also show that radio-selected AGN show stronger outflows and larger outflow sizes when carefully matched to control samples which suggests that radio-selected AGN may trace an evolved phase of AGN activity. Our results are important in the context of AGN duty cycle and highlight IFU data's potential to deepen our knowledge of AGN and galaxy evolution.

2024-06-28
11:00
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Aarynn Carter (STScI)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2024-06-28
11:00
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Physical and chemical evolution of planet‐forming disks
Dima Semenov (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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Abstract
The formation and composition of planets and their atmospheres are among the most intriguing and challenging scientific topics. The outcome of planet formation and the resulting planetary systems' architectures are set by the initial conditions in the birth sites of planetary systems – planet-forming disks. These planet-forming disks are a natural outcome of the star formation process. The solar nebula, out of which the solar system emerged about 4.5 Gy ago, is one example of such an environment. In addition, hundreds of planet-forming systems are routinely observed nowadays in the dust continuum and multiple atomic and molecular lines (from optics to radio wavelengths). In my KoCo talk, I will show how the observations and theoretical models are used to infer key disk properties and present our current understanding of disk thermal and density structures, masses, dynamics, grain properties, and chemical composition. I will talk about how various processes during star and planet formation affect the resulting spatial distributions and abundances of various ices and gaseous species, ranging from simple inorganic to complex organic molecules. Last but not least, I will also briefly talk about how the physical and chemical properties of these disks are linked to the physical properties and chemical composition of the emerging terrestrial rocky and gas giant planets, as well as primitive bodies such as asteroids and comets.

2024-07-02
16:30
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Peering Inside Giants: How Solar System information and JWST Data Transforms Our Understanding of Exoplanet Interiors
Professor Yamila Miguel (Leiden Observatory)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture hall (gHS)
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Abstract
Abstract to be announced. Those unable to attend the colloquium in person are invited to participate online through Zoom (Meeting ID: 942 0262 2849, passcode 792771) using the link: https://eu02web.zoom-x.de/j/94202622849?pwd=dGlPQXBiUytzY1M2UE5oUDRhbzNOZz09 During her visit to Heidelberg, Prof. Miguel will be available for meetings by arrangement with her host Dr Lorena Acuna (acuna@mpia.de).

2024-07-04
11:15
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Unlocking the various evolutionary pathways of sun-like stars
Nicole Reindl (LSW)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1.OG
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Abstract
There is no one way to live a life. How true this statement is also for stars is well reflected in the zoo of H-deficient stars, and strikingly beautiful and diverse planetary nebulae morphologies. In this talk I will give an overview of how my research on hot, evolved stars has and will help to disentangle the various evolutionary paths of sun-like stars.

2024-07-05
11:00
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Maximilian Häberle (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-07-05
11:00
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Stan Letchev
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-07-05
11:00
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Eric Gaidos
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-07-09
16:30
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Gravitational-wave Paleontology: a new frontier to study the Formation, Lives, and Deaths of Massive Stars Across Cosmic Time
Dr. Floor Broekgaarden (Columbia University)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture hall (gHS)
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Abstract
We are on the precipice of the Big Data gravitational-wave era. Pairs of stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars across our vast universe occasionally merge, unleashing bursts of gravitational waves that can now be detected here on Earth. Over the next few years, the population of detected mergers will rapidly increase from about a hundred today to millions of detections per year as new observing runs and next-generation detectors provide data with ever-increasing precision and to larger distances, pushing the reach of gravitational-wave astronomy to the edge of the observable universe! Most excitingly, this wealth of data will provide an unprecedented probe of the physics of black holes and neutron stars, and of the evolution of the binary massive stars that once formed them. This could open the new frontier of ‘gravitational-wave paleontology’: studying massive stars and binary evolution from their ‘remnant’ compact object mergers, with the goal of answering some of the biggest open questions in astrophysics today: How do these gravitational-wave sources form? What can we learn from them about the formation, lives, and explosive deaths of massive stars across cosmic time?  How do these sources help to enrich the universe with heavy metals? In this talk, I will outline the main bottleneck in this field: the “Progenitor Uncertainty Challenge”. I will discuss how my research group is leading efforts to identify, quantify, and eventually overcome this challenge with the aim to open the new frontier of gravitational-wave paleontology and make unprecedented discoveries about massive stars across cosmic time from gravitational waves, as well as from other upcoming multi-wavelength and multi-messenger observations. Those unable to attend the colloquium in person are invited to participate online through Zoom (Meeting ID: 942 0262 2849, passcode 792771) using the link: https://eu02web.zoom-x.de/j/94202622849?pwd=dGlPQXBiUytzY1M2UE5oUDRhbzNOZz09 During her visit to Heidelberg, Dr Broekgaarden will be available for meetings by arrangement with her host, Michela Mapelli (mapelli@uni-heidelberg.de)

2024-07-11
11:15
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Early and late, near and far: New JWST and NOEMA studies of different AGN populations
Caroline Bertemes
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1.OG
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Abstract
The lives of galaxies are governed by the baryon cycle, which involves the accretion of gas, its consumption via star formation, and its ejection or heating through feedback from stars and active galactic nuclei (AGN). In massive galaxies, the crucial impact of AGN feedback for regulating star formation has been supported by a wealth of observational and theoretical studies. In this talk, I will highlight results from two distinct surveys, studying AGN with diverse outflow strengths, at different redshifts and at different evolutionary stages. Firstly, I will present results from the JWST Early Release Science Program Q3D studying three luminous quasars with large-scale outflows at different redshifts (z~0.4, 1.6, 3). Specifically, the targets are undergoing the rare and intense extremely red quasar phase, believed to represent an early “blow-out” stage: After a quasar is fed large amounts of gas funnelling to the centre (entraining dust), it launches violent outflows that will rapidly clear out the central dust. I will share new insights into the geometry, mass loading and kinematics of the winds, accretion, as well as localised physical conditions. I will also present a cross-comparison of virial black hole masses derived via multi-wavelength tracers, and discuss implications for the increasing number of studies on black hole growth at high redshift in the JWST era. On the low-redshift side, I will introduce a sample of AGN with low-velocity ionised outflows and suppressed star formation, and present a first look into their molecular gas distribution via new NOEMA (Northern Extended Millimeter Array) follow-up observations. These sources are suspected to be at a late evolutionary stage and potentially undergoing one of the final phases of AGN feedback before quenching.

2024-07-12
11:00
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Maximilian Häberle (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2024-07-12
11:00
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New proper motion catalog reveals fast-moving stars around an intermediate-mass black hole in Omega Centauri
Maximilian Häberle (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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Abstract
The intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) regime is still poorly constrained, with few detections between 150 and 10^5 Msun. This poses a challenge to our understanding of supermassive black hole formation in the early universe.
An IMBH in ? Centauri, the Milky Way's most massive globular cluster, has been suspected for almost two decades, but all previous detections have been questioned due to their assumptions and the possible mass contribution of a central cluster of stellar mass black holes.
I will present a new astrometric catalog for the inner region of ? Centauri, containing 1.4 million proper motion measurements based on 20 years of Hubble Space Telescope observations.
Our catalog is supplemented with precise HST photometry in 7 filters, allowing the separation of its complex subpopulations. The catalog is publicly available, providing the largest kinematic dataset for any star cluster.
Our new catalog revealed 7 fast-moving stars in the innermost 3 arcseconds (0.08 pc) of ? Centauri. The inferred velocities of these stars are significantly higher than the expected central escape velocity of the star cluster, so their presence can only be explained by being bound to an IMBH. From the velocities, we can infer a firm lower limit of the black hole mass of ?8,200 Msun. In addition, we compare the full distribution of stellar velocities to N-Body models that suggest the presence of an IMBH with M?50,000 Msun. These results confirm ? Centauri hosts an IMBH which makes this the nearest known massive black hole and, after the Milky Way center, only the second where we can track the orbits of multiple individual bound companions.

2024-07-16
16:30
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Local Galaxies as Cosmic Bridges
Dr Claus Leitherer (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture hall (gHS)
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Hot massive stars are observed both individually in the Galaxy and in its nearest neighbors, as well as in the integrated light of galaxies at cosmic dawn. In this talk I focus on massive stars and populations in galaxies at distance of a few to hundreds of Mpc. These “Local” galaxies are at a sweet spot where detailed studies of stellar properties are still feasible but at the same time global galaxy properties are available as well. Local galaxies can therefore serve as bridges between stellar astrophysics and observational cosmology. I will discuss our ongoing research on these galaxies and present new results on the stellar properties, chemical abundances and evolution, galactic outflows and escaping ionizing radiation into the intergalactic medium. Those unable to attend the colloquium in person are invited to participate online through Zoom (Meeting ID: 942 0262 2849, passcode 792771) using the link: https://eu02web.zoom-x.de/j/94202622849?pwd=dGlPQXBiUytzY1M2UE5oUDRhbzNOZz09 During his visit to Heidelberg, Dr. Leitherer will be available for meetings by arrangement with his host, Andreas Sander (andreas.sander@uni-heidelberg.de).

2024-07-18
11:15
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Massive Black Holes in Stellar Systems
Holger Baumgardt (University of Queensland)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1.OG
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Supermassive black holes are thought to exist in the centres of most massive galaxies and their masses have been found to correlate strongly with the properties of their host galaxies like overall luminosity or central velocity dispersion. Yet it is unknown what processes have established these correlations and if and how they continue towards lower mass systems. In my talk I will present results from our search for massive black holes in ultra-compact dwarf galaxies and in massive globular clusters of the Milky Way.

2024-07-19
11:00
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Tushar Suhasaria (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-07-19
11:00
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Brett McGuire (MIT)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-07-23
16:30
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Tracing Star Formation Across Scales: A Case Study in the Solar Neighborhood
Professor Catherine Zucker (Center for Astrophysics, Harvard & Smithsonian)
Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Philosophenweg 12, Main Lecture hall (gHS)
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Abstract to be announced. Those unable to attend the colloquium in person are invited to participate online through Zoom (Meeting ID: 942 0262 2849, passcode 792771) using the link: https://eu02web.zoom-x.de/j/94202622849?pwd=dGlPQXBiUytzY1M2UE5oUDRhbzNOZz09 During her visit to Heidelberg, Professor Zucker will be available for meetings by arrangement with her host, Ralf Klessen (klessen@uni-heidelberg.de)

2024-07-25
11:15
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Unveiling the Role of Active Galactic Nuclei Winds in Shaping Galaxies: Impacts on Stellar Populations and Chemical Enrichment
Rogemar Riffel (UFSM)
ARI Institute Colloquium ( Hephysto link )
ARI, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, Seminarraum 1.OG
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Identifying and characterizing the processes that transform galaxies from star-forming to quiescent is a fundamental goal of extragalactic astronomy. One critical transformation mechanism is galactic-scale feedback due to active nuclei (AGN). In an ongoing collaboration between Brazil (UFSM - Santa Maria, UFRGS - Porto Alegre and UNIVAP - São José dos Campos) and Germany (ARI - Heidelberg, AIP - Potsdam), our goal is to investigate the impact of AGN feedback in galaxy through the study the properties of multi-gas phase AGN winds, stellar populations, environmental effects, and chemical abundances of AGN hosts. In this talk, I will introduce the collaboration and present previous results obtained by our group. We have been studying the AGN feeding and feedback processes over 15 years, using optical and near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of inner kiloparsec of nearby active galaxies obtained with large telescopes. These observations are used to spatially resolve the molecular and ionized gas emission structure and kinematics. We find that while outflows in ionized gas are seen in most objects studied, in molecular gas they are less common, which usually is dominated by rotation in the disk of galaxies and shows inflows in some cases. The observed ionized outflows are not powerful enough to effectively quench star formation in the AGN host galaxies in most cases.

2024-07-26
11:00
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Ian Crossfield (Kansas)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2024-07-26
11:00
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Ian Crossfield (Kansas)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2024-08-02
11:00
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Julianne Dalcanton (Flatiron)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
MPIA lecture hall,
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2024-08-09
11:00
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David Hogg (NYU, MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
MPIA lecture hall,
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2024-09-06
11:00
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Nico Winkel (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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tba

2024-09-13
11:00
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TBD
Dima Semenov (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-09-13
11:00
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Dima Semenov (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-09-20
11:00
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Jes Jørgensen (NBI)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-09-20
11:00
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Jes Jørgensen (NBI)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-09-27
11:00
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: Nicolas Bouche (CRAL)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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tbd

2024-09-27
11:00
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: Nicolas Bouche (CRAL)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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tbd

2024-10-04
11:00
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Tushar Suhasaria (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-10-11
11:00
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Mario Flock (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-10-11
11:00
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Mario Flock (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-10-18
11:00
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Leonard Burtscher (Astronomers for Planet Earth)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-11-08
11:00
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Tushar Suhasaria (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-11-22
11:00
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Beatriz Campos Estrada (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2024-11-29
15:00
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@3PM
Patzer Colloquium
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-11-29
15:00
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@3PM
Patzer Colloquium
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-12-06
11:00
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Heidelberg-Harvard speaker (CfA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)
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2024-12-13
11:00
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Paul Mollière (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

2025-01-31
11:00
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Sophia Vaughan (MPIA)
Königstuhl Kolloquium ( Home pageHephysto link )
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Level 3 Lecture Hall (301)

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